the septenary (diapholom) wrote,
the septenary
diapholom

Taoist qigong employs the inverse breath of inhaling to the back of the thoracic cavity

\

 rather than diaphragmatic breathing. Improper use of diaphragmatic breathing can lead to reproductive pathologies for women. (Nan Huai-Chin, 南懷瑾(1918年——), Meditation and the cultivation of immortality, Gu lu press, Tawain 1991 p.59)

 it is taught that humanity and nature are inseparable, and any belief otherwise is held to be an artificial discrimination based on a limited, two-dimensional view of human life. According to this philosophy, access to higher energy states and the subsequent health benefits said to be provided by these higher states is possible through the principle of cultivating virtue (de or te 德, see Tao Te Ching, chapters 16, 19, 28, 32, 37, and 57). Cultivating virtue could be described as a process by which one comes to realize that one was never separated from the primal, undifferentiated state of being free of artificial discrimination that is the true nature of the universe. Progress toward this goal can be made with the aid of deep relaxation (meditation), and deep relaxation is facilitated by the practice of qigong.

 and how qigong can bring forth “supernormal abilities” (teyi gongneng 特異功能).

The psychosomatic discourse emphasizes the inexplicable power of qigong and relishes its occult workings, whereas the rational discourse strives to demystify many of its phenomena and to situate it strictly in the knowledge of modern science."[6]

much of China's scientific establishment believes in the existence of Qi. Controlled experiments[citation needed] by the Chinese Academy of Sciences in the late 1970s and early 1980s concluded that qi, when emitted by a qigong expert, "actually constitutes measurable infrared electromagnetic waves and causes chemical changes in static water through mental concentration." (The Hindu culture refers to this as Prana, the Japanese culture uses the character ki, and the Hawaiian culture calls it mana.)[7]

Theories about the cultivation of elixir (dan), "placement of the mysterious pass" (xuanguan shewei), among others, are also found in ancient Chinese texts such as The Book of Elixir (Dan Jing), the Daoist Canon (Tao Zang) and Guide to Nature and Longevity (Xingming Guizhi).

in cultural contexts, PRC sources do refer to qigong's roots in daoyin and qi circulation in ancient times as a method to regulate one's qi for the benefit of longevity.[14]

See also

 

Tags: ch'i kung
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